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Welcome to the first installment of Within the Shadows, a series of videos that will give you a peek behind the curtain of some of the stories in SHADOWS OVER MAIN STREET VOLUME 2. We hope that you enjoy these videos and the insights offered by the authors. And please remember to follow along with us on Facebook and Twitter to see all this kind of content the moment it becomes available!

 

Note: If you cannot hear the audio on the above video, you may need to right click on it and select “Unmute”

Happy Friday the 13th! It’s finally here!

Get it now at Amazon and other retailers! Here is the link: https://www.amazon.com/Shadows-Over-Main-Street-2-ebook/dp/B075SD2VDY/

You know this place. Seems normal enough. But you know better, don’t you? You’ve heard rumors of strange histories. You’ve seen hints of dark deeds.

Turns out you can go home again, and the shadows will be waiting for you. Bram Stoker Award® nominated editors Doug Murano and D. Alexander Ward bring you Volume 2 of their best selling, critically-acclaimed small-town Lovecraftian anthology series. Within these pages, you’ll discover:

* America’s pastime awakening dark secrets buried deep within the earth.

* Vietnam War heroes who glimpse something worse than war and return home to discover a new kind of hell waiting for them.

* The music of a generation—of many generations—revealed as something older, hungrier and more insidious than a bad acid trip.

* A war-widow who rediscovers love and passion… only to cultivate the world’s end.

Featuring stories by: Joyce Carol OatesGary A. BraunbeckJohn F.D. Taff, Lucy A. Snyder, Joe R. Lansdale, Max Booth III, Jay Wilburn, Suzanne Madron, C.W. LaSart, Ronald Malfi, Eden Royce, Damien Angelica Walters, Douglas Wynne, Michael Wehunt, Erinn Kemper, James Chambers and William Meikle. With a foreword by Laird Barron and stunning illustrations by Luke Spooner.

Every turn you take leads back to Main Street. We’ve been waiting. Welcome home.

SHADOWS OVER MAIN STREET, VOLUME 2 — Now available for pre-order!

Bram Stoker Award® nominated editors Doug Murano and D. Alexander Ward bring you Volume 2 of their best selling, critically-acclaimed small-town Lovecraftian anthology series.

Featuring stories by: Joyce Carol Oates, Gary A. Braunbeck, John F.D. Taff, Lucy A. Snyder, Joe R. Lansdale, Max Booth III, Jay Wilburn, Suzanne Madron, C.W. LaSart, Ronald Malfi, Eden Royce, Damien Angelica Walters, Douglas Wynne, Michael Wehunt, Erinn Kemper, James Chambers and William Meikle. With a foreword by Laird Barron and stunning illustrations by Luke Spooner.

Every turn you take leads back to Main Street. We’ve been waiting. Welcome home.

Click HERE to visit the Amazon link and pre-order your copy today!

We have an official release date. Shadows Over Main Street Volume 2 is coming FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13th. Get a look at the official cover art (by the talented Luke Spooner).

From Cutting Block Books and the Bram Stoker Award-nominated editing duo who brought you the smash-hit anthologies Gutted: Beautiful Horror Stories and Shadows Over Main Street comes an all-new volume of small-town Lovecraftian terror! Featuring stories by an all-star lineup: Joyce Carol Oates, John F.D. Taff, Joe Lansdale, Gary A. Braunbeck, Damien Angelica Walters, Ronald Malfi, Douglas Wynne, Michael Wehunt, Suzanne Madron, Max Booth III, Jay Wilburn, CW LaSart, Eden Royce, Erinn Kemper, James Chambers, Willie Meikle and Lucy A. Snyder. With a foreword by master of the weird, Laird Barron!

Turns out you can go back home again…and the Shadows Over Main Street await.

JUNE17-SOMS1-2NDED-3

The stars are right! You’ve seen the signs! One of 2015’s best-selling and most celebrated horror anthologies returns. The second edition of Shadows Over Main Street: An Anthology of Small-Town Lovecraftian Terror rises from the depths on June 17th!

“Shadows Over Main Street demonstrates most convincingly that fear lurks in our towns and villages, in darkened alleys, and in the shadowy human heart. This anthology represents a dynamic cross section of contemporary horror.” –-Laird Barron, Bram Stoker Award winning author of The Beautiful Thing That Awaits Us All

“Shadows Over Main Street is a masterful blend of stories fit for both die-hard Lovecraft fans and readers new to the genre. Each and every tale is wickedly delicious.” –Jonathan Maberry, New York Times bestselling author of Fall of Night and V-Wars.

With stories and poems by: Stephanie Wytovich, Nick Mamatas, Kevin Lucia, Chesya Burke, Brian Hodge, Mary SanGiovanni, James Chambers, Tim Curran, Aaron Polson, T. Fox Dunham, Richard Thomas, Gary Braunbeck, Adrian Ludens, Rena Mason, Lucy A. Snyder, Cameron Suey, Lisa Morton, Jay Wilburn, John Sunseri, and Josh Malerman. And a foreword by the legendary Ramsey Campbell.

Yes, that’s right. The wildly talented Luke Spooner has done it again and rendered a beautiful and creepy piece of cover art for the second book in the Shadows Over Main Street anthology series. Take a gander at this! (Click it to enlarge)

Shadow Street Art

We’ll share the full cover layout when it’s ready but for now you can gaze longingly at this cover art. But that kid on the bike? Yeah, don’t stare too long into his eyes.

 

 

Welcome to the “Behind the Shadows” series of blog posts, where every week or so we will share a peek inside the minds of our authors and learn about the stories behind the stories. This week, Tim Curran peels back the facade of small-town America and talks inspiration for his story, “The Thing with a Thousand Legs.”

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In the American collective consciousness, we have an idealized portrait of the small town of yore as an idyllic place of soda fountains, quaint barbershops, parades, brass bands in the park, charming country churches, freckle-faced children carving pumpkins, and cantankerous oldsters sweeping the walks. Here you can know your neighbor, the streets are clean, the air is fresh, and the grass grows high and green. There may be a stratum of truth to this, though much of it is the result of pervasive pop culture—everything from Mayberry RFD to Norman Rockwell—and a goodly amount of nostalgia for what never really was and romanticizing about what could never be.

When I sat down to write “The Thing with a Thousand Legs” I was very much aware of how, as a people, we want our small towns to be and how, in fact, they really are. Having grown up in such a place, I knew that while they were pretty on the surface there was often a dark seam of hypocrisy and intolerance beneath. I decided that was the very underpinning of my story—the beauty above and the rot below, the handsome mask a small town shows the world and the grinning, toothless hag cackling underneath. In my story, Tobias Wormwell is not only born to the wrong family but doing a job that the good, clean, decent folk of Cobb Town find beneath their dignity. He is a rag picker that lives in the local dump and whose family’s grim history is tied up with that of the town itself. He is an unpleasant reminder of the town’s true past, its rigid class structure and narrow-minded gentility. He knows where the bodies are buried and which trees were used for hanging. He mars the view of the town’s rose-colored glasses and they hate him for it. And, for this very reason, he decides the time has come for them to stare deep into the mirror of their own souls, to strip away the pretense and confront the macabre truth of their ancestry. Evil is as evil does.

– Tim

 

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Tim Curran hails from Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. He is the author of the novels Skin Medicine, Hive, Dead Sea, Resurrection, Hag Night, The Devil Next Door, Long Black Coffin, Graveworm, Skull Moon, Nightcrawlers, and Biohazard. His short stories have been collected in Bone Marrow Stew and Zombie Pulp. His novellas include Fear Me, The Underdwelling, The Corpse King, Puppet Graveyard, Sow, Leviathan, Worm, and Blackout. His short stories have appeared in such magazines as City Slab, Flesh&Blood, Book of Dark Wisdom, and Inhuman, as well as anthologies such as Dead Bait, Shivers IV, World War Cthulhu, and, In the Court of the Yellow King. His fiction has been translated into German, Japanese, and Italian. Find him on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/tim.curran.77
And on the web at:
www.corpseking.com

Tim’s story appears in Shadows Over Main Street from Hazardous Press, available now: http://www.amazon.com/Shadows-Over-Main-Street-Lovecraftian-ebook/dp/B00SXHSYUK/ref=zg_bs_tab_pd_bsnr_3

For regular updates on the book, please join us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ShadowsOverMainStreet

shadows-cover-w-book

 

Welcome to the “Behind the Shadows” series of blog posts, where every week we will share a peek inside the minds of our authors and learn about the stories behind the stories. This week, James Chambers shares the vision for Knicksport, the setting for his story, “Odd Quahogs.”

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Why Knicksport?

Allen Koszowski asked me that question when I wrote my first Knicksport story, “Refugees,” which he published in Allen K’s Inhuman magazine in 2004. Allen liked the name, but it reminded him of Kingsport, which Lovecraft first wrote of in “The Terrible Old Man” but which may be best known as the setting of “The Festival.” Why not simply set my story in that existing piece of Lovecraftian real estate, Allen wondered. A fair point. My answer was that, like some other authors playing in the Lovecraftian sandbox, I wanted to stake out, on Long Island, my own parcel of Lovecraft country, and that Knicksport, while sounding suitably Lovecraftian, derived its name from one of New York’s nicknames, “The Knickerbocker State.”

The setting held a deeper purpose, though.

What most interests me about writing Lovecraftian fiction is translating Lovecraft’s ideas to eras, settings, and social contexts other than those about which Lovecraft wrote. I wanted the freedom to stray from Arkham, Dunwich, Innsmouth, Kingsport, and the Miskatonic River—but without severing all ties to those classic locations.

Knicksport provided the perfect means to do that.

The town, loosely framed after my hometown of Northport, is actually an amalgam of several towns in the area, all of which share a key trait in common. During the Colonial Era, they were part of a region that—despite being on Long Island—lay under the governance of the New England colonies, linking them indelibly (in my opinion, anyway) to true Lovecraft Country—plus at least one witch was executed there, lending them a touch of that particular horror that shaded the history of their neighbors across the Long Island Sound, a history Lovecraft often drew upon for his stories. It also placed my town geographically near enough to New York City to open up a trove of story possibilities.

Allen liked my rationale well enough to go with Knicksport for the story.

Ten years later, I’m glad he did.

At the time I wrote “Refugees,” I had no plans to go back to Knicksport, but I have returned several times since. Most ambitiously in The Engines of Sacrifice, my collection of four, Lovecraftian novellas, which share Knicksport as a common thread. Each one takes place in a different time period, from the early 1970s to the far future, painting a sketchy sort of Lovecraftian history for the town and hinting at a deeper, more expansive horror lurking beneath the surface. Most recently, “Odd Quahogs,” my story in Shadows Over Main Street, took me back there, this time to Raker’s, a bar down by the harbor, to tell the tale of two Korean War veterans, one turned bayman, and the other, bar owner, in the late 1950s. Another slice of Knicksport’s Lovecraftian legacy, which dates to around 1930, shortly after the horrific events told of in “The Shadow Over Innsmouth.”

In The Engines of Sacrifice, each tale gravitates around a particular Old One: Azathoth, Shub-Niggurath, Nyarlathotep, and Cthulhu. Each one also shifts the Mythos to a particular, social or cultural niche of the time period: New York City’s witchcraft subculture of the 60s and 70s, early 80s horror comics, mid-80’ Cold War secret researchers, and a future network of underground speculative writers. When the germ of the idea for “Odd Quahogs” came to me, I decided to bring yet another Lovecraftian entity to town and cast it against the social undercurrents of the time. The result, “Odd Quahogs,” is a snapshot of Knicksport, where spoken and unspoken social barriers shape people’s everyday existence, and everyone lives in the shadows of dark forces, both human and inhuman.

Unlike when I wrote “Refugees,” however, when I finished “Odd Quahogs,” I knew I’d be returning to Knicksport. A couple of trips there are already planned.

More darkness to discover. More secrets to expose.

The town’s not done with me yet.

– James

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James Chambers’ tales of horror, crime, fantasy, and science fiction have been published in numerous anthologies, collections, and magazines. Publisher’s Weekly described The Engines of Sacrifice, his collection of four Lovecraftian-inspired novellas, as “chillingly evocative.” His other works include the novella Three Chords of Chaos, The Dead Bear Witness and Tears of Blood (the first two novellas in the Corpse Fauna series), and the story collections Resurrection House and The Midnight Hour: Saint Lawn Hill and Other Tales. His stories have appeared in the award-winning Bad-Ass Faeries and Defending the Future anthology series as well as Allen K’s Inhuman, The Avenger: Roaring Heart of the Crucible, Bare Bone, Chiral Mad 2, Clockwork Chaos, Deep Cuts, Fantastic Futures 13, The Green Hornet Chronicles, In an Iron Cage, The Spider: Extreme Prejudice, To Hell in a Fast Car, Truth or Dare?, Qualia Nous, Walrus Tales, With Great Power, and many others. He is online at www.jameschambersonline.com.

James’s story appears in Shadows Over Main Street from Hazardous Press, available now: http://www.amazon.com/Shadows-Over-Main-Street-Lovecraftian-ebook/dp/B00SXHSYUK/ref=zg_bs_tab_pd_bsnr_3

For regular updates on the book, please join us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ShadowsOverMainStreet

shadows-cover-w-book

 

 

We are thrilled and honored to see that so many contributing authors to Shadows have been named Bram Stoker Award nominees this year. So we offer our congratulations to authors Josh Malerman, Rena Mason, Lucy A. Snyder, Richard Thomas and Stephanie M. Wytovich who all made the final ballot! To celebrate, we have lowered the price on the Kindle version of Shadows Over Main Street to 99 cents for the next few days. So if you were on the fence about picking up a copy, this is your chance to take the plunge into the shadows!

“Shadows Over Main Street is a masterful blend of stories fit for both die-hard Lovecraft fans and readers new to the genre. Each and every tale is wickedly delicious.” –Jonathan Maberry, New York Times bestselling author of Fall of Night and V-Wars.

Click here to grab yours today!

Welcome to the “Behind the Shadows” series of blog posts, where every week we will share a peek inside the minds of our authors and learn about the inspirations behind their contributions. This week, Lucy A. Snyder talks about her approach to her story, “The Abomination of Fensmere” and where we might see her protagonist in the future.

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When I was writing “The Abomination of Fensmere”, I wanted to meld a Lovecraftian setting and atmosphere with a more modern Southern gothic tale. I also thought it would be an interesting challenge to drop a young, Nancy Drew-reading protagonist into a world of cults, madness, and cosmic horrors.

 

My protagonist Penny took hold of my imagination and I wrote a direct sequel for Caelano Press’ The Court of the Yellow King entitled “The Girl With the Star-Stained Soul”. As you might guess, that story ties in with Robert Chambers’ King in Yellow mythos.

 

Using those two stories as a jumping-off point, I’m partway through a young adult novel featuring Penny and all the horrors she has to survive in a fateful summer down in Fensmere, Mississippi.

 

– Lucy

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Lucy A. Snyder is the Bram Stoker Award-winning author of the novels Spellbent, Shotgun Sorceress, Switchblade Goddess, and the collections Orchid Carousals, Sparks and Shadows, Chimeric Machines, and Installing Linux on a Dead Badger. She’s had two new books out in 2014: Shooting Yourself in the Head For Fun and Profit: A Writer’s Survival Guide from Post Mortem Press, and her story collection Soft Apocalypses from Raw Dog Screaming Press. Her writing has been translated into French, Russian, and Japanese editions and has appeared in publications such as Apex Magazine, Nightmare Magazine, Jamais Vu, Pseudopod, Strange Horizons, Weird Tales, Dark Faith, Chiaroscuro, GUD, and Best Horror of the Year, Vol. 5.She lives in Columbus, Ohio with her husband and occasional co-author Gary A. Braunbeck and is a mentor in Seton Hill University’s MFA program in Writing Popular Fiction. You can learn more about her at www.lucysnyder.com.

Lucy’s story appears in Shadows Over Main Street from Hazardous Press, available now: http://www.amazon.com/Shadows-Over-Main-Street-Lovecraftian-ebook/dp/B00SXHSYUK/ref=zg_bs_tab_pd_bsnr_3

For regular updates on the book, please join us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ShadowsOverMainStreet